Monthly Meetings

June 2015 Monthly Meeting
June 11th Meeting of the Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society to be held jointly with the Northeastern Section of the Younger Chemists Committee
Thursday, June 11, 2015
Nova Biomedical
200 Prospect Street, Waltham, MA

4:30 pm
Board Meeting - Long Range Planning, 2nd floor board room
5:30 pm
Social Hour
6:30 pm
Dinner
7:30 pm
Welcome, Dr. Katherine Lee, NESACS Chair
Topic: Studying Biomolecules with Super- Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy
Speaker: 2014 Nobel Laureate W.E. Moerner, Harry S. Mosher Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics (b. 1953)
 
Education: B.S., A.B., B.S., 1975, Washington University; M.S., 1978; Ph.D., 1982, Cornell University

 

Awards: Roger I. Wilkinson National Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer, 1984; IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Awards for photon-gated spectral hole burning, 1988, and for single-molecule detection and spectroscopy, 1992; Elected Fellow, American Physical Society, 1992; Elected Fellow, Optical Society of America, 1992; Earle K. Plyler Prize, 2001; Elected Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2001; Harry S. Mosher Professor, Stanford University, 2002 -; Geoffrey Frew Fellow, Australian Academy of Sciences, 2003; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2004; Member, National Academy of Sciences, 2007; Wolf Prize in Chemistry, 2008; Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics, 2009; Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award, 2012; Outstanding Alumni Achievement Award, Washington University, 2013; Kirkwood Award Medal, Yale University, New Haven Section of the American Chemical Society, 2013; Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry, 2013; Nobel Laureate, 2014
 
Chemistry Research Area: Biophysical, Chemical Physics,
Physical
W.E. Moerner

The Nobel Prize-winning microscopy techniques developed in part by Stanford's W.E. Moerner have allowed scientists to visualize precise molecular mechanisms inside living cells, opening new windows to how life can be studied. The path-breaking work of Professor Moerner and his colleagues has made a major contribution to our ability to observe molecules at the smallest scales, opening up new possibilities for discovery in areas ranging from disease management to drug development. "Prior to W.E.'s work, we all believed in molecules, but no one had ever seen one," said his long-time colleague in the Stanford Chemistry Department, Professor Richard N. Zare. “He was the first one to allow us to actually visualize a molecule by helping to create a method in which fluorescence in individual molecules is steered by light. It opened up all sorts of new experiments in which you can see how cells divide, how the ribosomes can make proteins, and how the cells work." Through collaborations with colleagues in medicine, biology, applied physics and electrical engineering, Moerner has helped reveal key details of how Huntington's proteins damage the brain, how bacterial proteins regulate DNA replication and cellular division in time and space, and the precise structures of the cellular antennae that, if mutated, can trigger various diseases in humans.
Professor Moerner received his B.S. and A.B. degrees from Washington University in 1975 and his M.S. and PhD degrees from Cornell University in 1978 and 1982. He is currently the Harry S. Mosher Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics at Stanford University.
8:30 pm
Post-Meeting YCC Networking Event at:
The Graff Pub - 467 Moody Street, Waltham

For those would like to join us for dinner, register by NOON, Thursday, June 4th using PayPal: http://acssymposium.com/paypal.html. Select the pay with credit or debit card option and follow the additional instructions on the page. Cost: Members, $30; Non-members, $35; Retirees, $20; Students, $10. Dinner reservations not cancelled at least 24 hours in advance must be paid.
If you wish, join us for the evening program only, starting at 7:30 PM. Register by NOON, Thursday June 4th, using PayPal: http://acssymposium.com/paypal.html. Select the “Seminar Only” option. The fee is $1.
New members or those seeking additional information, contact the NESACS Administrative Coordinator, Anna Singer, at secretary@nesacs.org (preferred) or at (781) 272-1966, 9 AM - 5 PM.
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED – RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED BY NOON, JUNE 4th FOR THIS EVENT
Parking is available at 200 Prospect Street along the perimeter of the building; signs will be posted to direct people to the building entrance.
By Car:  
From the North: From I-95 South, take Exit 26 to merge onto US-20 toward Weston/Waltham.
Take a slight left to merge onto US-20 East toward Waltham/Boston. Proceed for 1 mile, and then take a slight right onto Vernon Street. After 0.3 miles, turn right onto Prospect Street. 200 Prospect Street will be on the left.
From the South: From I-95 North, take Exit 26 to merge onto US-20 toward Waltham/Weston. Merge onto US-20E. Proceed for 0.8 miles, and then make a slight right onto Vernon Street. After 0.3 miles, turn right onto Prospect Street. 200 Prospect Street will be on the left.
click for larger view
   
From the West: From Mass Pike East, take Exit 14 for I-95 North toward Waltham/Portsmouth NH and merge onto I-95 North. Proceed for 1.9 miles and then take Exit 26 toward US-20 toward Waltham. Merge onto US-20E. Proceed for 0.8 miles, and then make a slight right onto Vernon Street. After 0.3 miles, turn right onto Prospect Street. 200 Prospect Street will be on the left.
From the East: From Mass Pike West, take Exit 17 toward Newton and merge onto Washington Street and follow signs for Newton. After 0.8 miles, turn right onto Crafts Street. After 1.3 miles, make a slight right onto Waltham Street. After 0.3 miles, continue on High Street. After 0.6 miles, continue onto Maple Street. After 0.3 miles, continue onto Prospect Street. 200 Prospect Street will be on the right.
click for larger view
   
By public transportation:  
Commuter Rail
  • Nova Biomedical is a 15 minute walk from the Waltham stop of the MBTA Fitchburg Commuter Rail.
Bus
  • Nova Biomedical is a 12 minute walk from the Main St./Hammond St. stop of the MBTA 70 bus.
  • Nova Biomedical is a 10 minute walk from the Moody St./Maple St. stop of the MBTA 505 bus.
 
 

Previous Meetings

Agendas
2013
2014
   
   
Feb
   
Mar
   
   
   
Sep
   
   
   
   


2008
2007
2006
2005
Jan
Jan
Feb
Apr
Dec
Minutes
2013
2014
   
   
Feb
   
   
   
   
Sep
   
   
   
   



Annual/Special Meeting Minutes
2013
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 

2007
 
2006
 
2005
 

 


Presentations

Presentation from NESACS Southeastern MA Area Event at UMA Dartmouth on Oct. 3, 2013 (Jack Driscoll)
Dr. Joseph Francisco Presentation at the January 2009 Meeting
Town Hall Forum - Feb. 18, 2010